A Book Review of Ariel, by Fia Essen

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(Buy it here on Amazon. Visit the author’s website. Find it on Goodreads.)

Ariel Morton has hit rock bottom. Or, is it just her attitude that has? Well, she’s recently lost her dream job, lost her driver license, gotten dumped by the love of her life (who was also her best friend). She lives in a hovel, has no friends, feels outcast from her own family, and is in credit card debt that seems impossible to get out of. She’s made a few mistakes and has told a few lies, but she finds herself trapped in a prison inordinate to the mildness of her foibles. Ah yes, the quarter-life crisis. This is where we enter the story.

On the first page of the book we’re introduced to the mysterious Muse Agency, a private—very private—consulting company reported to have worked miracles in Ariel’s hometown of Singapore. Details are transferred strictly via whisper network and shrouded in something close to legend. This seems to be the plot in store for us: The Muse Agency is going to change Ariel’s life. That’s far from the case.

In fact, her life does swing a hairpin turn by the end of the book, but  only because she finally learns to steer. Very little actually changes for Ariel on the outside. Sure, there is a new love interest (expect something closer to Emma than Fifty Shades of Grey), and that credit card debt is taken care of in a surprising twist. But mostly, the agency forces Ariel to scrutinize her life and make the uncomfortable changes she’s been avoiding for years. We suspect Ariel’s changes must happen from within pretty early on in the novel, but it’s still fun to watch it all play out. Her dry sense of humor and resistance to conformity makes for an entertaining soul journey.

The most interesting part of the book, and one that I thought unique, is Fia Essen’s way of bringing the world of the expat into focus. This is a microcosm of which I had no real understanding and it’s a fascinating life. Essen’s own experiences make Ariel’s life as an expat seem realistic and authentic. I call Singapore her “hometown” in the beginning of this review, but that idea isn’t something she really understands. Born in one country, with heritage in two others, Ariel has globe-trotted for most of her life; first, because of her parents’ careers, but later because constant travel was what she knew. A peek into this lifestyle makes Ariel worth the read on it’s own.

If you’re looking for hardcore realism in which main characters are killed off, x-rated scenes abound, and everyone is generally unhappy, this is not your book. If you believe in that light at the end of the tunnel, and maybe hope there is one at the end of your own road, you’ll enjoy Ariel.

sarahwathen

Sarah is the author of the new Young Adult novel, The Tramp, which is the first book in her epic saga, Bound. She is also currently working on a related novella entitled, Wicked Lover, which will be released in serial format on Amazon every two months. View the trailer for The Tramp, and listen to its original soundtrack! Find more info and links at www.sarahwathen.com. An artist turned author, Sarah's literary work incorporates art judicially, both in plotlines and in supporting social media. A reader can view characters' art and posters for fictitious events in Shirley County, listen to samples of character's favorite music and music that inspired the writing process, and even purchase a charm given to the heroine of The Tramp. LayerCake Productions is Sarah Wathen's independent publishing company, responsible for producing all video, audio and imagery for the Bound saga. Visit www.layercakeproductions.com for more info.

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2 Responses

  1. I’m simply chuffed to bits with this review! Bags of thank yous to you, Sarah 🙂 It’s really interesting for me to see how my story is perceived by readers. And it gives me an opportunity to learn how to get my message across.

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